Sunday, November 10, 2013

CS5 - Video Analysis and Open Source Physics

After attending the briefing

  1. https://sites.google.com/a/moe.edu.sg/2013-y3-physics-performance-task/home by RVHS team
  2. http://leongsterinc.blogspot.sg/2013/09/blog-post.html by RGS team
  3. Tracker discussion forum on OSP






Updated 17 October 2013
http://opal.moe.edu.sg/events?ptid=6286&func=activity_view&rid=100198

CS5 - Video Analysis and Open Source Physics

Target Audience:Physics Teachers (Secondary)

Synopsis :
Studies have shown that the design of the learning environment accompanied by appropriate computational modelling and tools can become a powerful way to engage students in self-directed learning. For example, the low cost and flexibility of video analysis tools has greatly expanded the scope and context for learning for both teachers and students. By incorporating video motion analysis, students performed better than using the traditional approach of teaching. Video analysis pedagogy (Brown, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009; Brown, 2010; Brown and Cox, 2009) in conjunction with the use of dataloggers and Physics simulations promote active and minds-on learning in the classroom. Computer models made using Easy Java Simulation (Christian and Esquembre, 2012) based on real world data and customisable for school use are readily available for free.

The team’s findings indicate that students enjoy learning Physics through analysing and applying Physics concepts through real life videos. We have conducted professional development workshops for teachers who have implemented such Physics learning programmes in both upper secondary schools and junior colleges.

The sharing session is based on the work done by two Networked Learning Communities on Open Source Physics and Video Analysis in Physics. We will share our practitioner knowledge on how to design and conduct effective inquiry using Easy Java Simulation, tracker, video analysis tools and how networked learning enables schools to support one another in improving lesson design and students’ understanding of Physics.


Team Members
Mr Wee Loo Kang / MOEHQ-ETD
Mr Leong Tze Kwang / Raffles Girls School
Mr Choo Shueh Yi / River Valley High School
Mr Lee Tat Leong / River Valley High School

Date: 11 Nov 2013
Time: 16:30-17:30
Venue: Fermi Lab
Capacity: 39


Academy Symposium
Celebrating Learning, Transforming Practice
“Collaborate. Engage. Inspire.”
11 Nov 2013
Singapore Science Centre, 15 Science Centre Road,Singapore 609081

TitleVideo Analysis and Open Source Physics Open Source Physics
Presenters: Lee Tat Leong,  Leong Tze Kwang , Gideon (Shueh Yi) & Wee Loo Kang
emails:
lee_tat_leong@moe.edu.sg
tzekwang.leong@rgs.edu.sg
choo_shueh_yi@moe.edu.sg
WEE_Loo_Kang@moe.gov.sg

all facilitators to attend a facilitators’ training for the concurrent session. The briefing details are below:
Date: 27 September or 4 October
Time: 3.00 pm – 5.30 pm
Venue: Academy of Singapore Teachers (TR16 and 17 for 27 Sep or Learning Lab for 04 Oct)
Please indicate your availability for the training in the google form by 30 Aug.

Accepted Abstract from tat leong
http://www.academyofsingaporeteachers.moe.gov.sg/professional-growth/conferences-n-events/academy-symposium/programme-2013/concurrent-session-c
CS11
Video Analysis and Open Source Physics
Venue : Fermi Lab
Target Audience : Physics Teachers

SYNOPSIS : Studies have shown that the design of the learning environment accompanied by appropriate computational modelling and tools can become a powerful way to engage students in self-directed learning. For example, the low cost and flexibility of video analysis tools has greatly expanded the scope and context for learning for both teachers and students. By incorporating video motion analysis, students performed better than using the traditional approach of teaching. Video analysis pedagogy (Brown, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009; Brown, 2010; Brown and Cox, 2009) in conjunction with the use of dataloggers and Physics simulations promote active and minds-on learning in the classroom. Computer models using Easy Java Simulation (Christian and Esquembre, 2012) based on real world data and customisable for school use are readily available for free.

The team’s findings indicate that students enjoy learning Physics through analysing and applying Physics concepts through real life videos. We have conducted professional development workshops for teachers who have implemented such Physics learning programmes in both upper secondary schools and junior colleges.
The sharing session is based on the work done by two Networked Learning Communities on Open Source Physics and Video Analysis in Physics. We will share our practitioner knowledge on how to design and conduct effective inquiry using Easy Java Simulation, tracker, video analysis tools and how networked learning enables schools to support one another in improving lesson design and students’ understanding of Physics.

TEAM MEMBERS : Mr Wee Loo Kang / Educational Technology Division; Mr Leong Tze Kwang / Raffles Girls School; Mr Choo Shueh Yi / River Valley High School,; Mr Lee Tat Leong / River Valley High School

Abstract:
The motivation for networking with the Open Source Physics can be attributed to the need to design learning environments-tools for the collection of scientific data, which we argue is key to enactment of inquiry in physics education. Word problem solving 'pedagogy' is not only a pedagogical mismatch; conducting physical labs could be inhibitive from safety and economic standpoints (Loo Kang Wee & Goh, 2013; Loo Kang Wee, Goh, & Chew, 2013).

Therefore, our contribution to public knowledge is our research and development on customized (Loo Kang Wee & Mak, 2009) computer models using the Easy Java Simulation (Christian & Esquembre, 2012; Esquembre, 2012) authoring toolkit (L.K. Wee & Lye, 2012) that are not only tailored to the Singapore syllabus but will be free, based on real world data, and supported with literature reviewed researched pedagogical features. Our theortical underpinning is on how people learn from personal experience of actually doing physics rather than solving physics word problems.

We will share our practitioner knowledge on easy java simulation (Loo Kang Wee, 2012a, 2012b) and tracker (Brown, 2012; Loo Kang Wee & Lee, 2011) that intertwined global and local communities. Our physics curriculum can be download from http://weelookang.blogspot.sg/p/physics-applets-virtual-lab.html and http://ltlphysics.blogspot.sg/p/simulation.html


Student:
In paper (Loo Kang Wee, 2012b, p. 306), evidence on student learning includes:
(1) Active learning can be fun
‘. . . [It] is an eye opener . . . [we] do not usually get to learn with virtual learning environment . . . and it makes learning fun and interesting’.
‘The lesson was fun and makes us think instead of just listen[ing] to teacher and remember[ing] whatever the teacher said’.
‘It makes learning much more interesting and fun. It makes us want to learn and find out
more about the topic’.

(2) Need experience to understand

‘. . . It [this lab] lets me figure out the concepts rather than just listen[ing] and believing what is taught without understanding’.
‘Normally people would have to experience any physics concepts themselves hands [-] on to really remember concepts. Lectures on the other hand may not be effective since maybe what the lecturer is bringing through us is unclear, and thus practical lessons to learn concepts is a great learning deal’.

(3) Simulation can support inquiry learning and thinking like real scientists

‘These kinds of lesson force us to think critically. It makes us look at the results, analyse and then find the trend within, which is a really good way to learn independently. It also gives us confidence and a sense of accomplishment when the conclusions we arrive at are correct.’
‘Such vlab [virtual lab] lesson effectively utilizes the IT resources to enhance lessons, making physics lessons less dry. Besides, by identifying trends in values first hand, I can remember it easier rather than via lecture notes and slides’.

(4) Need for strong inquiry learning activities

‘The activity worksheet did not generate much thinking and concept understanding, just simply presents a set of values to copy to get the answers’.
‘It [virtual lab] helps hasten the process of learning but the exchange of data [in the worksheet activities] is troublesome’.

(5) Need for testing and well-designed simulation [7]

Some students suggest visual and audio enhancements such as ‘better quality so that the simulations could be more interesting and appealing’ and ‘add sound effects’.
A good suggestion that surfaced is to make the ‘program [simulation] designed as a game, thereby making it more interactive. At the end a table can be provided and it would
provide us [students] with the values. From there, we do analysis’.
This suggestion inspired us to design ‘Game for concept testing’ described earlier.

(6) Appreciative learners

‘I [student] really thank you for spending time coming up with this program. You are really an educator who cares and dares to try new things. Thanks! Hope you can come up with even better programs so that they can empower students in physics subject.’
‘Thank you teachers for spending time to develop this app.’


Teacher
Our physics curriculum http://weelookang.blogspot.sg/p/physics-applets-virtual-lab.html and http://ltlphysics.blogspot.sg/p/simulation.html can serve as portfolio of teacher technological, pedagogical and content knowledge.



Reflection:
We have networked in http://www.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ntnujava/index.php?board=28.0 and http://www.compadre.org/osp/, sharing our learning with the world.


Implications:
Future directions could be physics chapter leading in the area of use of meaningful tools for physics education and contributions to benefit anyone in the world, instead of just for Singapore teachers and students.




Reference:

  1. Brown, D. (2012). Tracker Free Video Analysis and Modeling Tool for Physics Education, from http://www.cabrillo.edu/~dbrown/tracker/ 
  2. Christian, W., & Esquembre, F. (2012, Jul 04, 2011 - Jul 06, 2011). Computational Modeling with Open Source Physics and Easy Java Simulations. Paper presented at the South African National Institute for Theoretical Physics Event, University of Pretoria, South Africa. 
  3. Esquembre, F. (2012). Easy Java Simulations Retrieved 13 September, 2012, from http://www.um.es/fem/EjsWiki/pmwiki.php 
  4. Wee, L. K. (2012a). Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite Model, from http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=11775&DocID=2634 & http://www.compadre.org/osp/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=11775&DocID=2634&Attachment=1 (public download) 
  5. Wee, L. K. (2012b). One-dimensional collision carts computer model and its design ideas for productive experiential learning. Physics Education, 47(3), 301. 
  6. Wee, L. K., & Goh, G. H. (2013). A geostationary Earth orbit satellite model using Easy Java Simulation. Physics Education, 48(1), 72. doi: 10.1088/0031-9120/48/1/72 
  7. Wee, L. K., Goh, G. H., & Chew, C. (2013). Enabling Gravity Physics by Inquiry using Easy Java Simulation. Paper presented at the 5th Redesign Pedagogy, Singapore. http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1303/1303.0079.pdf 
  8. Wee, L. K., & Lee, T. L. (2011). Video Analysis and Modeling Tool for Physics Education: A workshop. Paper presented at the 4th Redesigning Pedagogy conference, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. http://conference.nie.edu.sg/2011/papers_pdf/WOR074.pdf 
  9. Wee, L. K., & Lye, S. Y. (2012). Designing Open Source Computer Models for Physics by Inquiry using Easy Java Simulation. Paper presented at the 20th International Conference on Computers in Education (ICCE 2012) Singapore Interactive Event, Singapore. http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1210/1210.3412.pdf 
  10. Wee, L. K., & Mak, W. K. (2009, 02 June). Leveraging on Easy Java Simulation tool and open source computer simulation library to create interactive digital media for mass customization of high school physics curriculum. Paper presented at the 3rd Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference, Singapore.